› Cutting Glass Shapes

3 Methods For Cutting Glass Shapes

Increase Your Cutting Options

You've got your pattern and you're wondering how to approach cutting the shapes. Is it best to use a template? And if so, do you stick the template on or do you trace around it? What about the English method that you've heard of but don't quite understand?

There's always more than one way to do the same thing in stained glass, and this is no exception. The good news is that you can start with the one that suits you best and as you build up your skills and confidence you can add the others.
Before you know it you'll be ready to cut any shape in any glass.

1. Tracing Method

Carefully drawing around each template shapes on to the glass before cutting just inside the traced line.

tracing around orange glass circle

Video still: Tracing around template shapes for cutting

When best to use this?

  • Works with either light cathedral (transparent) or opaque glass that you can't see through.
  • If you're using it with dark cathedral glass you'll have to use a pen that will show up on the dark colour. Those gold permanent pens are good for this.
  • If you're using glass that's very irregular it's sometimes hard to trace as accurately as you need to cut shapes for a perfect fit.

cutting orange circle

Keep your shapes the right size by cutting on the the inside of the black line

The technique is very simple:

I'm assuming that you can already cut glass. If you can't here's my glass cutting tutorial for you.

  1. Cut out all the individual shapes in your pattern from stock paper (thin card). You can do this either with regular scissors or with foil pattern cutting shears.
  2. Make sure that these template shapes are 1/32 (1mm) smaller all the way around than the shapes on your pattern. This is to allow for the thickness of the foil when you wrap it around the glass.
    You can see more detailed instructions for cutting your pattern here.
  3. Put them all on the pattern at the same time to check their accuracy.
  4. Hold your template shapes absolutely still on the glass - taking care to get the grain direction going the correct way - and draw around it with a fine permanent pen (Sharpie)
  5. Then cut - and this is very important - on the inside of the black line.
    If you don't do this, your glass shapes won't have that 1/32 (1mm) gap in between them that you need to get your project to fit together. It will all get bigger and bigger and bigger!
  6. Repeat for each of the shapes.

perfect orange glass circle

Video still: Your shape should end up the exact same size as the template

Summing Up

Lots of people find this method the easiest and most versatile but it can add time because you have to cut all the template shapes out first.
It can also lead to some accuracy problems as the templates can move when being traced or the pen is too thick.


2. Templates Method

Sticking the templates on with glue before using their edge as a guide for cutting the shapes.

sticking template on blue glass

Video still: Sticking template on to glass with glue

When best to use this?

  • Works for any type or darkness of glass
  • Not good if you're wanting to be quick as this is the slowest method

cutting blue glass with template

Keep the cutter wheel as close to the template as you can when cutting

This is what you do:

  1. Cut out your templates from stock paper or thin card exactly the same as numbers 1-3 above.
  2. Using rubber cement (Copydex in the UK) or a glue stick, stick a template on your chosen piece of glass.
  3. Wait for the glue to adhere if necessary.
  4. Now make the score with the cutter wheel snug up against the template. If the wheel slips onto the template simply stop and replace it back to where it slipped off.
  5. Continue around the whole shape in this manner.
  6. If necessary, you can grind the edges a couple of times before the template gets wet and soggy.
  7. Repeat for every shape.
  8. Remove template only when you're happy that the shapes all fit together.

blue glass cut accurately to template

Video still: Glass cut accurately to template with only cutter and grozing pliers!

Summing Up

This method is reliable and consistently produces very accurate results. It can also be used on all types of glass which is a big plus.
The downside is that it is very time-consuming. But then having ill-fitting shapes wastes time and glass!


3. The English Method

Placing the glass directly on top of the pattern and looking down through the glass to cut the shapes freehand.

cutting blue glass on lightbox

Video still: Cutting freehand on a light box

When best to use this?

  • Works well for light transparent (cathedral) glass
  • If you have a light box it works well with dark cathedral glass too
  • You can't use this technique for opaque glass that you can't see through

blue glass cutting on light box

Make sure you are directly over the glass and can see where you're cutting

How to do it:

  1. If you are using dark transparent glass place your pattern on the light box. If you can see through the glass you can do this on your work bench instead of a light box
  2. Put the glass on top of the pattern
  3. Making sure that you are directly above the pattern and can easily see where you're going, make the scoreline
  4. Don't rush, go slow and steady. It's not a race!
  5. Be careful to cut on the inside of the black pattern line to ensure that your shapes are the correct size
  6. Repeat for each cut
  7. Groze or grind the edges as necessary to tidy up

blue shape accurately cut on light box

Finished shape on pattern. Note that the black line is still visible, showing the shape is a perfect fit

Summing Up

It's a great way of cutting transparent glass quickly as there's no extra steps - no cutting templates, no tracing around them and no sticking them on.
But there are some drawbacks.
It takes a lot of practice to become accurate at this method so results can be a little disappointing when you first give it a go.
It is only good for transparent glass which rules out all the opaques - a lot of glass!


Conclusion

If you do persevere and learn all 3 techniques you will have the best thing for a stained glass artist - options.
Your question won't be 'can I cut that shape' anymore, it will be 'which is the best method to use to cut that shape?'.
And you'll have the confidence to cut them all.

We Welcome Your Comments

Let us know what you think about this page by leaving your comment below.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program,
an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by
linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites


Custom Search

Stained Glass Mil


facebook badge