› Cutting Pattern Pieces
› Cutting Pattern Pieces

Accurate Pattern Cutting

Stained Glass Templates That Fit

Once you've designed or found a stained glass pattern that you're happy with, the next thing you need to do is make copies of it and cut the indivdual shapes out accurately.
These will be used as templates for cutting all your glass pieces.


How to Make a Cutting Pattern


The following steps are all easy, but it's worth taking a bit of time doing them accurately. Think of it as a puzzle. If any of the pieces don't fit, making the final picture will be difficult.

What you need: Your stained glass pattern. Strong tracing paper. Carbon paper. Thin card. A pencil. Scissors.

For copper foil: Fine felt tip pen. Pattern shears for copper foil.
For lead came: A 1/16 (2mm) black felt tip pen. Lead pattern shears.


1. Making Copies

This is all about the order. Put the card at the bottom. Then the carbon paper (face down), followed by your pattern. The tracing paper goes on top of the pile.
Pin or stick the edges down. It's very important that nothing moves at this stage.

blue card, green cactus pattern with tracing and carbon paper

Laying down order for making cutting pattern

2. Tracing And Numbering The Shapes

- With the pencil, draw over the pattern with a constant, firm pressure. You want to make sure that the pattern reads clearly on the thin card at the bottom.

- It's very important to number the shapes now, when all the pieces are together. I number mine at the top of each shape. This makes it easier when I'm trying to find how they fit together after they're all cut.

stained glass window pattern with traced lines and blue card

Numbered tracing paper and card pattern

At this stage you should have your pattern drawn on the tracing paper and the thin card.
Put aside the carbon paper and your stained glass pattern.

For copper foil:
On the tracing paper, go over all the lines - except the outside lines - with the fine black felt tip pen. This will be used for assembling your panel when you're ready.

For lead came:
Do the same as above, only this time with the 1/16 (2mm) thicker black felt tip pen. This line represents the gap which the heart of the lead will fill later on.


3. How To Cut The Pieces

- Now move on to the thin card. You are going to cut the templates for the stained glass from this. Cut neatly around the edge of the whole design with regular scissors.

- The next step is to cut a thin strip of card out between each shape. Why? Because either the width of the copper foil, or the heart of the stained glass lead came will fill the gap when you assemble the panel. That means that you have to cut all the glass pieces a tiny bit smaller to make room for the foil or heart of the lead.

- Luckily, the copper foil and lead shears are designed to cut the correct amount of card away from your pattern. Simply place them so that the line is in between the two outside blades.
Cut around each pattern piece. Do it slowly, especially around corners, as the strip can get caught up. Break it off every inch or so to stop this happening.

- Once you've cut them all, check their accuracy by placing them on the tracing paper. You should be able to see the black felt pen line between each shape. The photo below may help.

- Make sure you have the correct shears for the technique you are using, either copperfoil or lead. The lead shears cut a wider 1/16 (2mm) slice than the copper foil ones.

blue stained glass template pieces on pattern

Checking to see if the pattern pieces are accurate

By now you should have:

- one colored design or pattern
- one sheet of tracing paper, with your pattern drawn in either a fine line (copper foil) or a thicker 1/16 (2mm) line (lead came)
- each shape numbered on the tracing paper
- all your pattern pieces cut out of thin card and numbered

green cactus pattern with stained glass pattern piece in blue card

Pattern templates all cut to size

If so, you're ready for Stained Glass Cutting.

 

 

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